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20100901
20100930
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important than editorial judgment? where is the drive for speed and mobility taking us? >> if online journalism came in a very fast, packaged vehicle, if turning to that next page of the news was as easy as turning the page of a magazine or a newspaper, we'd see people consuming even more news online. >> how is technology changing the way we produce, share, and find the news? that's our question today on "the future of news." >> a government without a tough and vibrant media of all sorts is not an option for the united states of america. >> more voices is always better for our industry, and more ways of distributing and more ways of reaching people and more ways that people can consume our media. >> so you're just gonna get everything, and you as a consumer have to choose. >> from the newseum in washington, d.c., this is "the future of news." welcome to the knight studio and our conversation about media and news in the digital age. i'm frank sesno. joining me today are two groundbreaking and digitally savvy reporters. mara schiavocampo of nbc is the first digital journalist in networ
to nielsen research, and the number is growing every day. easy-to-use software is helping citizen journalists tell their stories, and professionals are using citizen sources more and more. >> we treat them as reliable sources of information, but, like we would with the police source, the courthouse source, and the capitol hill source, we verify that. >> ...these images literally streaming into us here at cnn. >> as traditional news media grapple with sinking budgets and shrinking newsrooms, can citizen journalism help fill the void? what role should citizen journalists play? that's our topic today on "the future of news." >> a government without a tough and vibrant media of all sorts is not an option for the united states of america. >> more eyes, more ears, more voices out there, and a more sophisticated audience as well, because it's the audience that's gonna keep us all honest. >> when citizen journalists want to be trusted, they have to do certain things to earn that trust. >> from the newseum in washington d.c., this is "the future of news." and welcome to the knight studio and our conve
, cbs news, where there have been a lot of job cuts, where a lot of the correspondents who used to work overseas, report for your broadcast, no longer exist. is cbs or these other organizations that have cut all these jobs really still capable of serving the public interest? >> they are capable of doing so, and you've touched on what i think is the important point not just for journalists, but for the public at large. part of what's wrong with american journalism, and i do not exempt myself from this criticism, is the corporatization, politicalization, and trivialization of the news. and in an era where, by my account, no more than 4, some say no more than 6, very large corporations control 80% or more of the truly mass distribution of news in the country, when i say "corporatization," that's what i'm talking about. politicalization, what i'm talking about is that increasingly, various places on the media landscape--everything from cable television and through the internet--cater to people from one partisan political point of view--either left, right, democrat, or republican. we've had
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3